The pipeline from the landfill to the utility’s LNG facility had to be built as economically as possible. Using Polyamide 11 (PA11) instead of epoxy-coated steel saved almost $300,000. “We continue to see an increase in efforts to bring to market products that are designed, manufactured, and fabricated for high-pressure pipe systems,” says PPI President Tony Radoszewski. “The goal is to provide substantial value via cost savings, installation ability, and long life.”
Arkema Inc. The pipeline from the landfill to the utility’s LNG facility had to be built as economically as possible. Using Polyamide 11 (PA11) instead of epoxy-coated steel saved almost $300,000. “We continue to see an increase in efforts to bring to market products that are designed, manufactured, and fabricated for high-pressure pipe systems,” says PPI President Tony Radoszewski. “The goal is to provide substantial value via cost savings, installation ability, and long life.”

A former Nebraska landfill is now supplying the state’s largest city with additional energy. The Douglas County Landfill, which closed in 1989 and has 4.6 million tons of waste in a 123-acre area, is projected to produce 130,000-140,000 MMBTU a year of untreated gas.

The landfill began collecting and burning the gas in 1995. But instead of continuing to waste the gas, the county decided to put it to work.

In January 2015, a 3-mile pipeline was completed to bring the gas from the landfill to the nation’s fifth largest public gas utility with more than 223,000 customers. The 2-inch line ties into Metropolitan Utilities District’s 12-inch, 125 psi gas main in Omaha that feeds its liquefaction facility.

According to district documents, the landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) project will save $45,000 annually, along with 125,000 decatherms of compressed natural gas (CNG).

Next page: Cleaner gas