Launch Slideshow

Image

Fun With Fats

Fun With Fats

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA33%2Etmp_tcm111-1343543.jpg?width=300

    true

    Image

    300

    Grease Management Supervisor James Jones (left) and Water Quality Associate II Bo Mathews dispensed magnets and pencils during a public workshop in July on how greasy food residues cause backups and overflows. Photo: Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA34%2Etmp_tcm111-1343547.jpg?width=300

    true

    Image

    300

    Gwinnett County's public-awareness campaign centers around three characters: the Fats Fiend, the Oil Offender, and the Grease Goblin. Images: Jordan, Jones & Goulding

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA36%2Etmp_tcm111-1343551.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Launched last summer, wwwunclogthefog.com includes educational brochures, frequently asked questions, videos, childrens' activities, and helpful links. Image: Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA38%2Etmp_tcm111-1343555.jpg?width=300

    true

    Image

    300

    The Unclog the FOG Web site includes puzzles that test how well students have internalized what the Web site teaches. Image: Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA35%2Etmp_tcm111-1343550.jpg?width=300

    true

    Image

    300

    Many people believe that garbage disposals can handle fats, oils, and greases, but all they really do is chop up the problem and move it downstream. Images: Jordan, Jones & Goulding

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpA37%2Etmp_tcm111-1343552.jpg?width=300

    true

    Image

    300

    In addition to a communications program that integrates the Internet with in-person educational presentations, restaurant grease trap inspections minimize greasy buildup on sewer lines. Photo: Gwinnett County Department of Water Resources

The firm designed a schematic that outlined the site site's s navigational framework and served as a placeholder for the developing content. This ensured the site would flow the way the department wanted it to and feature appropriate topics and subject matter. The firm didn't provide Web site design services because the county's communication staff develops and maintains all coding and formatting.

The project was divided into three tasks: developing content for a proprietary Web site; researching existing materials, such as videos or interactive animations, within the public domain; and creating brochures.

The first step was developing content for an interactive Web site with visual elements that would be used in all related material.

When Water Resources and JJG representatives met in mid-March 2009 for the program's kick-off meeting, department employees emphasized their desire to personify key elements to catch p people's attention. This led to the inception of the Fats Fiend, the Oil Offender, and the Grease Goblin. (Though the name Grease Goblin had been used by other public agencies, Gwinnett County created an entire entirely new character.) Their nemesis would be “Secret Agent H2O,” who works to keep the group at bay by recruiting school children and community members to join the fight.

This narrative served as the basis for conveying relevant information.

Each character has its own page on the Web site that explains what foods it can be found in and how it “attacks” the collection system. Other pages use photos and graphics to illustrate the impact of greasy food residue on the sewer system and ways to prevent it. Such pages include frequently asked questions; the role that the county, restaurants, and the public play in minimizing residue buildup; activities, such as puzzles and coloring sheets, designed specifically for children; and how to request a speaker. The overall tone is conversational and informative.

There's also a page explaining how the collection system works, including information on the miles of pipe and number of pump stations and plants that make up the wastewater treatment system. This information was included to provide context for why preventing buildup is so critical.