RPZ/hydrant cart

  • “Any time hydrant water must be metered, we require residents to use this cart,” says Hudsonville (Mich.) Public Works Department Executive Assistant Amy Robinson.

    Credit: City of Hudsonville (Mich.) Department of Public Works

    “Any time hydrant water must be metered, we require residents to use this cart,” says Hudsonville (Mich.) Public Works Department Executive Assistant Amy Robinson.
Dutch Besteman
Department of Public Works Superintendent
Hudsonville, Mich.
616-669-0200 ext.1424
dbestema@hudsonville.org

We have to go back about eight years, to before Hudsonville, Mich.’s Dutch Besteman moved up the ranks from mechanic to department of public works superintendent, to appreciate how he saw a solution where no one else had.

Whenever the department rented its hydrant meter and reduced pressure zone (RPZ) device to residents who had been permitted to use a city hydrant, making sure all components — meter, backflow preventer, hydrant wrench, hose, and hose attachments — made it back was a trying task.

That’s where Besteman came in. He engineered, designed, and built a dolly cart that holds everything residents need to measure how much water they use to fill a swimming pool, make concrete, or prime a hydroseeder. Everything except the hose attachment and wrench is attached to the dolly at all times. The unit fits easily into the back seat or trunk of a car and is just as easily removed and placed near the hydrant. The equipment comes back dry, ready for the next person who needs it, and — most importantly — completely intact.

“Several people have commented on how simple this is,” says Amy Robinson, public works executive assistant. “Former employees call to ask how to make one or request pictures so they can mimic it.”

Kelley Lindsey


  • A potato digger is pulled by a tractor, digs into the ground, and uses a chain system to lift potatoes out of the ground and shake off dirt and vines. To convert it into the above gravel reclaimer, Gilliam County (Ore.) Road Department Road Master Dewey Kennedy and Mechanic Larry Hardie removed its chains and installed a conveyor belt. They also added cleats to the belt to help convey the material up, and they added a vibrating screen to the back of the machine to screen large debris.

    Credit: Larry Hardie

    A potato digger is pulled by a tractor, digs into the ground, and uses a chain system to lift potatoes out of the ground and shake off dirt and vines. To convert it into the above gravel reclaimer, Gilliam County (Ore.) Road Department Road Master Dewey Kennedy and Mechanic Larry Hardie removed its chains and installed a conveyor belt. They also added cleats to the belt to help convey the material up, and they added a vibrating screen to the back of the machine to screen large debris.

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