Concrete

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    Flail Selection, Plane and Simple

    First introduced nearly 35 years ago, small surface planers (scarifiers) have seen their acceptance and use on municipal maintenance projects grow significantly.

     
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    On a Roll

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) is just what it sounds like. This stiff, zero-slump concrete mixture can be placed with asphalt-type paving equipment and then compacted with rollers.

     
  • Goodness gracious, great balls of concrete

     
  • Down & Dirty February 2007

    Officials at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection worry that herds of hungry deer munching vegetation around drinking water reservoirs might be threatening the supply.

     
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    Rolling with the changes

     
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    World of Concrete 2007's Most Innovative Products

     
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    Getting to the root of the issue

    A Gardena, Calif., company has come up with a solution that helps sidewalks and trees coexist peacefully.

     
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    Dam good flood prevention

    A new dam in Wise County, Va., makes use of roller-compacted concrete (RCC) as a flood-fighting structure.

     
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    Post-party pickup

    Take a page from these cities' playbooks to learn how to craft and execute an effective cleanup plan.

     
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    Concrete repairs: Fast and long-lasting

    Repair and maintenance often play a role in the pavement selection process.

     
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    Automating asphalt compaction

    Virtually all roller manufacturers in the U.S. market are removing the art from asphalt compaction and making it more of a science. BOMAG Americas, the Hamm Compaction Division (Wirtgen America), Ammann America, and Sakai all offer some version of intelligent compaction.

     
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    Public works leaders should take a hike

    PUBLIC WORKS Associate Editor Jenni Spinner asks: How often How often do you get out to see your town? Have you ever left the comfort of your office or truck cab to get out to take a good look at the town you serve? If you haven't, you're not getting the big-picture view—the one your constituents...

     
  • Choosing between asphalt and concrete pavement

    Hard-surfaced pavements, which make up about 60% of U.S. roads, typically are constructed with either hot-mix asphalt or portland cement concrete (commonly referred to as “asphalt” and “concrete,” respectively). Of those roads, more than 90% are asphalt.

     
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    Asphalt versus concrete

    The debate goes on: Which is better, concrete or asphalt? While there is no cut-and-dried answer, a smart public works official will consider the following questions before selecting a material for the next road project: Which pavement option is better for my specific application?

     
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    New York City constructs third water tunnel

     
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    San Diego dedicates new reservoir

     
  • World of Concrete's most innovative products

    Computer equipment, construction software, construction tools, and more -- the most innovative products of 2007, chosen from the thousands on display at the World of Concrete trade show, held Jan. 2007 in Las Vegas.

     
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    Paving with roller compacted concrete

    This is the finest product for city streets to come along in years,” said Marty Savko of Nickolas Savko & Sons, Columbus, Ohio.

     
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    Pervious pavement naturally absorbent

    Pervious pavement is a design alternative that allows water to percolate through the pavement structure and into underlying soils—an achievement that directly conflicts with even lecture on traditional pavement design delivered in universities across the country.

     
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    Lightening up concrete pipe

     
 
 
 
 

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