Interstate-80 Rehabilitation in Utah

“Interstate 80 is critical to our nation’s infrastructure,” says Matt Zundel, resident engineer for the Utah DOT. “About 80% of east-west truck traffic goes through here, so we’re always looking for ways to improve it.” In 2011 the agency launched its Renovate I-80 campaign to extend the corridor’s life with a series of long-sighted repairs to prevent more extensive reconstruction in the future.

The cement-treated asphalt base was coated with ePrime, an eco-friendly primer, to retain moisture for curing, and help bond the base material with the concrete overlay. Drivers did not require special permits to handle the water-based primer as they would with solvent-based products.

The cement-treated asphalt base was coated with ePrime, an eco-friendly primer, to retain moisture for curing, and help bond the base material with the concrete overlay. Drivers did not require special permits to handle the water-based primer as they would with solvent-based products.

Drivers were rerouted to two lanes of traffic while each side of the road was being reconstructed, but always with safety in mind. During winter months, all lanes were open to avoid head-to-head traffic.

A new section of I-80 in Utah won the 2016 Triad Award, sponsored partly by Public Works. The Utah DOT worked closely with the contractor and materials suppliers to coordinate the noteworthy project’s aggressive timeline, execute logistical challenges, and improve sustainability.

While placing 377,500 cubic yards of concrete for the $34.6 million I-80 repaving project Geneva Rock implemented many sustainable elements: reducing and replacing cement content, using eco-friendly primer, recycling materials, and reducing waste disposal. The original asphalt road through Silver Creek Canyon was built in the 1960s and had been repaved many times, including several “mill-and-fills” in the past 15 years. Much of the rutting and cracking was caused by the heavy-duty truck traffic, but frequent freeze/thaw cycles at the 6,400-foot elevation also took a toll.

Geneva Rock implemented a 3D wireless paving system for the second phase of the project. The contracting crew was trained to use the Trimble SPS930 Universal Total Station to control paver alignment and precise pan placement. Employees learned how to remotely steer the pavers and use the SPS930 Universal Total Station to control the pan for proper alignment, design, and slope of the pavement.

Drivers were rerouted to two lanes of traffic while each side of the road was being reconstructed, but always with safety in mind. During winter months, all lanes were open to avoid head-to-head traffic. The original asphalt road through Silver Creek Canyon was built in the 1960s and had been repaved many times, including several “mill-and-fills” in the past 15 years.

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