Advancing water-sector technology

Between 2000 and 2010, energy costs at DC Water's 370-mgd Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant increased by 48%. This is primarily due to the deregulation of the energy market in the mid-2000s and increases in the unit price of oil. Photo: District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority

The Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant is the only major point source of water pollution in the District of Columbia. DC Water is the only jurisdiction in the Chesapeake Bay watershed to reach and exceed its 2010 cleanup goals and is on track to meet the next level of performance by 2015. Discharge limits are 8.4 million pounds of nitrogen annually and a 12-month rolling average of 0.18 milligram/liter for phosphorus. In 2015, the nitrogen limit will drop to approximately 4.4 million pounds annually and phosphorous would be limited to 248,353 pounds/ year. Blue Plains is already meeting the phosphorous requirements. Photo: District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority

The 1,250 tons of biosolids DC Water currently produces each day are trucked to Virginia and other nearby states, where the Class B biosolids are applied to agricultural and nonagricultural lands for soil conditioning and fertilizer value. Photo: Ted Coyle

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