Launch Slideshow

Watertight tankers transport slurry to processing sites.

Best management policies for CGR

Best management policies for CGR

  • Spreading should begin a minimum of 1 foot from the shoulder, with each pass of the grinder moving the spreading operation farther down the slope to ensure no build-up of grinding residue.

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    Spreading should begin a minimum of 1 foot from the shoulder, with each pass of the grinder moving the spreading operation farther down the slope to ensure no build-up of grinding residue.

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    IGGA

    Spreading should begin a minimum of 1 foot from the shoulder, with each pass of the grinder moving the spreading operation farther down the slope to ensure no build-up of grinding residue.
  • Watertight tankers transport slurry to processing sites.

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/cgr-tanker_tcm111-2085716.jpg

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    Watertight tankers transport slurry to processing sites.

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    IGGA

    Watertight tankers transport slurry to processing sites.
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    IGGA

  • The ground material is vacuumed and spread evenly on the adjacent slopes by dragging a flexible hose or other approved device along the slope.

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    The ground material is vacuumed and spread evenly on the adjacent slopes by dragging a flexible hose or other approved device along the slope.

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    IGGA

    The ground material is vacuumed and spread evenly on the adjacent slopes by dragging a flexible hose or other approved device along the slope.
  • The integral component of a diamond grinder consists of a vacuum blower and confinement shroud around the grinding head.

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    The integral component of a diamond grinder consists of a vacuum blower and confinement shroud around the grinding head.

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    IGGA

    The integral component of a diamond grinder consists of a vacuum blower and confinement shroud around the grinding head.

Concrete road repairs often require the contractor and engineer to develop a plan to manage the residue generated during sawing and diamond grinding operations, known as sawing slurry or concrete grinding residue (CGR).

How slurry is managed varies across the country. In many rural areas it’s spread along adjacent slopes as the operation moves down the roadway. In some rural areas and all areas with closed drainage systems, it’s collected and hauled to a landfill for disposal.

In 2012, Minnesota removed slurry from the list of regulated solid wastes, freeing contractors to dispose the material on site, provided they follow state-sanctioned procedures. The result of a concerted effort by industry and the state DOT, the exemption was based in part on the International Grooving & Grinding Association’s (IGGA) recently updated Slurry Best Management Practices guide.

Slurry spreading disposal

In rural areas that have vegetated slopes, the slurry can be deposited on the slopes as the grinding operation progresses down the road. As part of the contract documents, the engineer shall identify wetlands and other sensitive areas where slurry discharge operations are not permitted. The engineer and contractor shall make a site inspection before the start of grinding to identify sensitive areas. Spreading slurry should not take place through these sensitive areas.

The spreading start and stop points shall be clearly marked on the shoulder of the road. The slurry generated while grinding in unpermitted areas shall be picked up and hauled for disposal in non-sensitive areas on the job. Do not allow the slurry to flow across the road into adjacent lanes.

The diamond grinding equipment shall be equipped with a well-maintained vacuum system that is capable of removing all standing slurry, leaving the road in a damp condition after the grinder passes. Spread the vacuumed material evenly on the adjacent slopes by dragging a flexible hose or other approved device along the slope.

The spreading should not take place on the shoulder. Spreading should begin a minimum of 1 foot from the shoulder, with each pass of the grinder moving the spreading operation farther down the slope to ensure no build-up of grinding residue. The slurry shall not be spread within 100 feet of any natural stream or lake or within 3 feet of a water-filled ditch. Restrict the spreading operation to above the high-water line of the ditch.

Do not allow grinding residue to enter a closed drainage system. The contractor is responsible for providing suitable means to restrict the infiltration into the closed drain system.

Slurry collection and pond decanting

In urban and other areas with closed drainage systems, the slurry shall be collected in water-tight haul units and transported to settlement ponds constructed by the contractor. These ponds may be constructed within or outside the right-of-way. The engineer shall approve all locations. Construct the ponds to allow for the settlement of the solids and decanting of the water for reuse in the grinding operation.

At the completion of the grinding operation, the remaining water will be allowed to evaporate or may be used in a commercially useful manner such as dust control. After drying, the remaining solids may be used as a fill material, a component in recycled aggregate, or any other commercially useful application. The pond area shall be reclaimed to its original condition and vegetated to protect against erosion.

Slurry collection and plant processing

The slurry shall be collected and hauled as with pond processing. There are various plant designs that may be used, such as centrifuge and belt press. Prepare the plant site to control any stormwater runoff in accordance with state regulations.

The site should be restored and vegetated when operations are complete. The processed water and solids are to be handled in the same fashion as the settlement ponds. The site may be within or outside the right-of-way. The engineer should approve site locations.