A stronger economy and relatively low gas prices are having a negative effect on U.S. highways. More people are driving, so more people are dying in crashes.
Daniel Boothe, Wikimedia Commons A stronger economy and relatively low gas prices are having a negative effect on U.S. highways. More people are driving, so more people are dying in crashes.

The percent of motor vehicle deaths increased last year, making it the deadliest driving year since 2008. Thirteen states experienced decreases, while the National Safety Council (NSC) estimates Oregon (27%), Georgia (22%), Florida (18%), and South Carolina (16%) experienced increases on the state level.

A stronger economy and lower unemployment rate are believe to be part of the reason for this increase. This increase also helps further the notion that driving remains one of the most dangerous tasks of days:

"These numbers are serving notice: Americans take their safety on the roadways for granted," said Deborah A.P. Hersman, NSC president and CEO. "Driving a car is one of the riskiest activities any of us undertake in spite of decades of vehicle design improvements and traffic safety advancements. Engage your defensive driving skills and stay alert so we can reverse this trend in 2016."

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