• At full capacity, the Borough of Edgewater's marina generates almost $400,000 every year between slip rental and winter storage. With an annual operating budget of $150,000, it more than pays for itself. Left to right are James Tansey, Ralph Rambone, Thomas Jacobson, Timothy Higgins, Thomas Quinton, and John Weber.

    Credit: Borough of Edgewater

    At full capacity, the Borough of Edgewater's marina generates almost $400,000 every year between slip rental and winter storage. With an annual operating budget of $150,000, it more than pays for itself. Left to right are James Tansey, Ralph Rambone, Thomas Jacobson, Timothy Higgins, Thomas Quinton, and John Weber.

Nineteen employees maintain streets, buildings, grounds, and parks; collect and recycle garbage; and bus senior citizens around New Jersey’s Borough of Edgewater. As if that weren’t enough to do, they’ve been caring for a marina the community’s owned and operated since 2006.

In addition to housing 82 boats, the marina serves as a public park with a 3.5-mile beachfront walkway and a landing for ferries carrying commuters to and from Manhattan one mile across the Hudson River. “Juggling these three uses on a daily basis can be difficult, but the marina operator finds ways of doing it,” says Public Works Superintendent Thomas M. Quinton Sr.

Thanks to the ferry landing and park, the marina requires year-round maintenance: repairing, cleaning, landscaping, and maintaining the docks and walkways. Marina Operator Thomas Jacobson and two seasonal employees also place boats in the water and remove them to storage when summer’s over. Additional staff is sent to help for larger projects.

“All employees play some role at some point in making it work,” says Quinton. “From landscaping to helping with repairs to shoveling the snow in the winter, everyone pitches in.”