Launch Slideshow

Error: less than 300px wide output not yet supported

Bringing on new plant

Bringing on new plant

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpBCB%2Etmp_tcm111-1346262.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Earth Tech

    Well No. 2, which is located near the Great Miami River in a flood plain, is situated on top of a platform.

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpBCC%2Etmp_tcm111-1346266.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Earth Tech

    Ben Roe, plant supervisor, checks the flow chart from the plant.

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpBCD%2Etmp_tcm111-1346269.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Earth Tech

    Brian Cheshire, plant operator, checks the oil level on the high service pump.

Staff training. Equally important is employee training in emergency response procedures and non-emergency functions such as OSHA-mandated lock-out/tag-out procedures, chlorine handling, changing filters, chemical spills, and personal protective equipment (PPE).

Preventive maintenance schedule. Every plant should maintain a preventive maintenance schedule that tracks the maintenance required for its unique equipment set. This information is found in each system's owner's manual and should be easily merged into a single reference guide.

Equipment maintenance and repair records. Plants also should document the work performed on each piece of equipment. Records should include the date of the procedure, the exact work done, who performed the work (e.g., vendor or staff member), the parts used, and the time required. Knowing the frequency of repairs, for example, also helps a plant identify equipment replacement needs.

Physical plant security. Since Sept. 11, 2001, water vulnerability has become a big issue, and water treatment plants around the nation are stepping up efforts to make their facilities more secure. The level of security needed depends, in large part, on your city's allocated budget, risk assessment and unique level of vulnerability. At Huber Heights, we've addressed this security issue by investing in alarm systems on all of the plant windows and doors, an automatic gate that controls access to the entire plant, fences surrounding the entire plant, and a surveillance camera.

While creating or upgrading a water treatment plant is a multi-faceted and often time-consuming endeavor, a sound strategy focusing on quality and service to your customers is the key to success.

— Inman is an operations manager for Earth Tech, overseeing the Rip Rap Road Water Treatment Plant in Huber Heights, Ohio.

O&M manuals at a glance

As you create your facility's O&M manual, don't forget these vital components:

Permits, standards, and regulations (available through your local/state EPA representative):

  • Water quality standards
  • Drinking water specifications
  • Pretreatment rules
  • Personnel licensing requirements.
  • Operation and controls

  • Type of water plant (e.g., gravity filtration system, ion exchange, softening plant)
  • Source of raw water (e.g., groundwater, service water)
  • Plant processes, from well to effluent.
  • Preventive maintenance

  • Equipment-specific schedules
  • Proper PPE for service and repairs
  • Vendor contact numbers
  • Equipment emergency repair numbers.
  • Emergency operating plan and procedures

  • Specific procedures for each type of emergency
  • Emergency chain of command
  • Disaster recovery location
  • Contacts and phone numbers for governing agencies (e.g., EPA, hazardous materials, fire department).
  • Staffing requirements

  • Number of staff members required
  • Required licenses for your type of plant.
  • Safety requirements

  • OSHA requirements
  • Hazardous materials communication procedures
  • Lock-out/tag-out processes.
  •