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Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country  primarily employed by counties and cities  to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

Sandy relief efforts continue

Sandy relief efforts continue

  • Sandy relief efforts continue

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country  primarily employed by counties and cities  to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp778D%2Etmp_tcm111-1746400.jpg

    true

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country primarily employed by counties and cities to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

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    Frank Aiello Studios

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion. More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country — primarily employed by counties and cities — to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nation’s state-to-state mutual-aid system. At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

  • Sandy relief efforts continue

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country  primarily employed by counties and cities  to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp878D%2Etmp_tcm111-1746402.jpg

    true

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country primarily employed by counties and cities to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    600

    Frank Aiello Studios

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion. More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country — primarily employed by counties and cities — to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nation’s state-to-state mutual-aid system. At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

  • Sandy relief efforts continue

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country  primarily employed by counties and cities  to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp924C%2Etmp_tcm111-1746403.jpg

    true

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country primarily employed by counties and cities to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    600

    Frank Aiello Studios

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion. More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country — primarily employed by counties and cities — to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nation’s state-to-state mutual-aid system. At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

  • Sandy relief efforts continue

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country  primarily employed by counties and cities  to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp9BC3%2Etmp_tcm111-1746404.jpg

    true

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country primarily employed by counties and cities to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nations state-to-state mutual-aid system.At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

    600

    Frank Aiello Studios

    Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion. More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country — primarily employed by counties and cities — to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nation’s state-to-state mutual-aid system. At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington.

Public works crews in Tenafly, N.J., clean up debris and downed trees after Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Seaboard in late October. States of emergency were declared from North Carolina to Connecticut. Thousands of homes were flooded, millions lost power, and more than 100 died as a result of the superstorm. New York and New Jersey were hardest hit, with overall damage in the U.S. estimated at more than $62 billion.

More than 2,500 emergency response personnel mobilized across the country — primarily employed by counties and cities — to provide aid in collaboration with their state governments to communities suffering from loss of life, infrastructure, and property. The response is being coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), the nation’s state-to-state mutual-aid system.

At press time, states providing assistance through EMAC include Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. Photo: Frank Aiello Studios