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Restoration transformation

Restoration transformation

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    Crews used colored concrete to restore streets in New Castle, Pa.; the project won a Main Street USA award from the American Concrete Pavement Association. Photo: ACPA

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    According to the Federal Highway Administration, diamond grinding can reduce accidents in wet-weather road conditions. Photo: International Grooving and Grinding Society

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    Geotechnical engineer Kevin Hoagland, P.E., uses a metal detector to find trolley tracks in pavement in Caldwell, Idaho's Cleveland Boulevard. Photo: Terracon Consultants Inc.

Do you know CPR?

Road departments find concrete pavement restoration to be a viable process.

“Transportation officials have transferred their emphasis over the past several years from system expansion to system preservation,” says John Roberts, executive director of the International Grooving and Grinding Association (IGGA). Road departments are increasingly turning to concrete pavement restoration (CPR) as a way to preserve their pavements.

According to the American Concrete Pavement Association (ACPA), the technique directly corrects the cause of pavement distress and adds seven to 12 years to pavement life. The association holds that some CPR projects have lasted more than 17 years before needing a second round of repairs.

Diamond grinding removes 0.1 to 0.25 inches of concrete from the surface. Grinding a pavement corrects faulting at joints and cracks, enhances surface texture, and reduces noise. The total square national yardage of diamond grinding jumped from 9.9 million in 2003 to more than 35 million in 2005, according to IGGA.

Common CPR terms:

Cross-stitching: adding reinforcing steel to hold longitudinal cracks or joints together tightly. This method is used on cracks in low-severity condition.

Diamond grinding: removing a thin surface layer using closely spaced diamond saw blades; creates a smooth, uniform pavement profile.

Dowel bar retrofits (DBRs): cutting slots across the joint or crack, cleaning transformation the slots, placing dowel bars, and backfilling with new concrete. DBRs link slabs at transverse cracks and joints so that the load is evenly distributed across the crack or joint.

Full-depth repairs (FDRs): removing at least a portion of the existing slab and replacing it with new concrete.

Joint and crack resealing: minimizes the infiltration of surface water and incompressible material into joints, thereby reducing subgrade softening, slowing pumping and erosion of the subgrade or sub-base fines, and limiting corrosion caused by deicing chemicals.

Partial-depth repairs (PDRs): removing deteriorated concrete, cleaning the patch area, placing new concrete, and reforming joints. PDRs correct surface distress and joint-crack deterioration in the upper third of the slab.

Slab stabilization: restores support by filling small voids that develop underneath the concrete slab at joints, cracks, or pavement edge.

For more information, contact the ACPA at 847-966-2272 or visit www.pavement.com.