2011 Top AEC Firms: Holding steady and looking ahead

You're enlisting help to plan for the future — and crossing your fingers that budgets follow suit.

    CASE STUDIES

  • A new landmark in town
    Composite water tower stabilizes rates and pressure for 36-square-mile township.
  • Bypass surgery
    State DOT combines precast concrete arches with a lightweight cellular overfill for a world's-first bridge design.
  • Burrowing beyond a consent decree
    Project shows tunneling can be as cost-effective for smaller communities as large cities.
  • Working around the railroads
    It took eight years and a 1,100-foot bridge, but engineers managed to eliminate two crossings for frustrated motorists.

Click here for a list of 2011's Top AEC firms



Past Top AEC Articles

2010 Top AEC Firms: Multipurpose solutions are on the rise

Primed by regulatory imperatives and the national focus on sustainability, operations integrate stormwater control measures into parks and streetscapes of all kinds.

  • Sea breeze
    A Massachusetts town powers its facilities with a wind turbine.
  • Community builder
    A county park unites residents of disparate housing developments.
  • Masters of integration
    Preparing for life after build-out, a combined water/wastewater utility maximizes supply by piggybacking on an airport expansion.
  • On the rebound
    A Florida beach town revitalizes its central business district.
  • Don't fear the audit
    A small town uses Washington's focus on sustainability to access almost half a million in stimulus funding.

Click here for a list of 2010's Top AEC firms


2009 Top AEC Firms: Early Returns

Click here for a look at our topAEC firms (A-R, S-Z)

Five months into the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, it's too early to tell how much impact the legislation has had. But with some projects under way, managers and manufacturers alike hope this is the beginning of a revitalized construction industry and the economy as a whole.

According to our fifth annual survey of the use of architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) firms, only 19% of respondents plan to use stimulus funds to retain a firm this year. Departments that have received funds, though, are quickly accessing their consulting partners.

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2008 Top AEC Firms: Switching Gears

No matter what happens, we're all in this together.

That's the theme of our fourth annual survey on the use of architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) firms.

When we e-mailed our questionnaire to readers in March, housing starts were at a 17-year low, down nearly 12% from February. Traditionally, the public market feels the affects of economic slowdowns several years after the fact; and, true to form, property and sales tax revenues are falling. Click here to read the complete article.



2007 Top AEC Firms: Partners in Project Excellence

No man is an island.

And neither is an infrastructure manager struggling to balance internal resources with community expectations.

Thus the importance of the relationship between public works departments, which are for the most part generalists, and for-profit firms that specialize in architecture, engineering, construction (AEC), or any combination thereof. Our third annual survey of the use of AEC firms by public agencies shows that this partnership continues to play a key role in the ability of infrastructure managers to meet the needs of their communities.

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2006 Top AEC Firms: Joint Venture

Partnering with an AEC firm is second nature for public works departments

Even with rising oil prices, the devastation of hurricanes Rita and Katrina, and rising inflation rates, the level and scope of public works projects completed did not change in 2005.

Many municipalities need help completing projects, whether they're new water treatment plants, building a new bridge, or updating an urban park. According to an exclusive survey of PUBLIC WORKS readers, 92% of municipal public works departments used architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) firms to complete projects of various types last year. This number has not fluctuated much over the past two years—public works departments heavily rely on these firms to work on one or all aspects of an engineering project.

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2005 Top AEC Firms: Leaders of the Pack

In business today outsourcing is common; public works departments are no different. No department by itself can handle all of the things that are thrown at it—from planning new parks to rebuilding outdated parking facilities to maintaining water treatment plants. Instead of hiring a full-time staff of architects, engineers, or construction managers, public works directors are turning to AEC (architecture, engineering, construction) firms to complete various projects.

Click here to read the complete article.