More stories about Wastewater & Stormwater

  • Reduce Private Property I/I

    Private property infiltration and inflow (I/I) problems have increased and will continue to increase until municipalities develop structured programs that identify the problem, define the needed rehabilitation, and oversee the repair.

  • Spare the Concrete

    Also referred to as microbiologically induced corrosion, biogenic sulfide corrosion is a big concern to engineers and practitioners because it contributes to the considerable cost of renovation of deteriorated sewer networks.

  • Keep Operators Sharp

    A proactive and relatively inexpensive program can help protect your valuable institutional understanding, better prepare your next generation of staff, and continuously fine-tune your system operator training program.

  • Forecast 2007: Water

    When it comes to the nation's potable-water supply, critical issues remain the same as last year, though some items—like U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations—shift slightly as scientists obtain more information about the effects of various compounds and impurities on public health.

  • Forecast 2007: wastewater/stormwater

  • APWA Expo Preview: water and wastewater

    A preview of APWA events related to water and wastewater.

  • Rerouting the flow

    For municipalities facing the difficult task of improving their wastewater infrastructure, pumping systems are critical.

  • Eliminate pollutant discharge

    As part of most programs that require stormwater permits, a stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) must be developed and implemented to reduce or eliminate pollutants from industrial activities and construction sites.

  • Diving into chemistry

    Most common problems with pool water chemistry can be attributed to five factors: free available chlorine residual, total chlorine residual, pH, total alkalinity, or calcium hardness. Fortunately, each factor can be corrected easily through careful monitoring, testing, and managing.

  • Reassessing Ranney Wells

    Ranney wells have come a long way since Leo Ranney installed the first horizontal collector well in the 1920s. These high-capacity wells offer an alternative to fields with many vertical wells.