More stories about Compensation

  • Process of elimination

    Like every infrastructure manager trying to capitalize on the benefits of trenchless construction, Matt Carter went through a process of elimination to determine what method works best for his agency's unique situation.

  • For the Birds

    Sarasota County had a problem: Farmers modified the land decades ago to retain water and nourish crops. Because it sloped to the south, excess water flowed in that direction. As developers paved the land to build new homes, the ground's ability to absorb water greatly decreased.

  • Restoration plan boasts billion-dollar price tag

  • Get what you deserve

    Each year, solid waste haulers pay hundreds of millions of dollars in franchise fees or gross receipt fees to local governments. Based on gross revenues billed to the haulers' customers, these fees compensate cities for the use of their streets and rights of way.

  • From sludge to fuel

    Five Los Angeles-area sanitation districts have signed on with Atlanta-based EnerTech Environmental, a developer of renewable energy technologies, to convert their biosolids into a renewable fuel, called E-Fuel.

  • Poll Says Voters Would Support Lasting Solution To Transportation Funding Crisis

    Pennsylvania's policymakers should not allow the fear of voter backlash to deter them from crafting a lasting solution to the state's transportation funding crisis, according to the results of a recent poll.

  • Time to lawyer up?

    Bogged down in disciplinary actions? Trying to write a "non-discriminatory" job description? City hall too busy to help out?

  • 2006 salary survey: How much are you worth?

    No one ever complains about getting paid too much. But how does your salary really stack up against that of your peers? PUBLIC WORKS magazine wanted to find out. Based on answers from 2600 readers just like you, we have a snapshot of how much money public works managers make.

  • Detroit suburbs explore water options

  • Debating impact fees

    Raising capital to meet utility renewal and replacement requirements is an ongoing challenge. Meeting service requirements of a growing population, new homes and businesses, or new recreational needs can make a public works manager feel like taking early retirement.