More stories about PENNSYLVANIA

  • Public-private challenges—and solutions

    Alan Gesford, a former public works director for several Pennsylvania municipalities, shares the experiences that informed his view on the public works production.

  • Porous pavements move stormwater efficiently

    Porous asphalt pavements with stone recharge beds are rapidly gaining popularity as major components of a storm-water management system. These pavement/stormwater systems are designed to reduce peak and total volume of runoff and also are effective in removing total suspended solids.

  • Small, medium, or large

    David versus Goliath. Efficient versus ineffective. Weak versus strong. This is how many people may compare small towns to large cities. Small towns' public works departments have small staffs, less red tape, and fewer political problems while big cities have large bureaucracies, more money, and...

  • Taking a diversion

    There are ways to reduce the amount of waste that goes into a landfill. And with the number of landfills decreasing, public works directors should be looking for ways to decrease the amount of solid waste that goes into these landfills. One way is to divert waste into other streams.

  • Pervious pavement naturally absorbent

    Pervious pavement is a design alternative that allows water to percolate through the pavement structure and into underlying soils—an achievement that directly conflicts with even lecture on traditional pavement design delivered in universities across the country.

  • Battling graffiti with paint brushes

    The very thought of tackling a graffiti-ridden city strikes terror in the heart of even the most seasoned public works officials. Even after the graffiti tags are cleaned up, the battle continues. It's usually a matter of only days before it comes back—sometimes on a larger scale.

  • Small town, big leadership

    Chad Garland hails from a town that few people can pronounce—and even fewer can find on a map. Zelienople (pronounced “zill-ee-in-opal”), a borough of just more than 4000 people, is in western Pennsylvania, about 30 miles north of Pittsburgh.