More stories about IOWA

  • No big deal

    When an event brings more people into a small town than the normal population, the public works department has to be ready. Water, wastewater, trash, roads, parks—all are impacted far beyond their originally intended capacity. Here's how two towns reacted.

  • Flooded town washed off the map

    At the end of September, bulldozers razed the entire town of Elkport, Iowa, erasing 150 years of history. The demolition came two years after the town's 86 former residents endured severe flood damage and dawdling by federal agencies that were slow to open their relief checkbooks.

  • Restoration transformation

    PUBLIC WORKS takes a close look at Iowa City's concrete pavement restoration (CPR) efforts, a finds them to be lasting and effective.

  • Iowa bridge marks technology milestone

    A four-year research partnership between the Iowa DOT (IDOT), Iowa State University (ISU), and Lafarge North America has lead to the opening of an innovative concrete bridge in the Hawkeye State.

  • Finding funding for a water project

    In 2000. Mason City, Iowa, began planning an upgrade of its water treatment system in order to meet the regulations established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Final Radionuclide Rule. Until the new standard became effective on Dec. 8, 2003, the city's treatment for drinking water had...

  • World-class compost facility makes waves

  • Trenchless option a success for new bike path

  • Lightening up concrete pipe

  • Asphalt recycling gains momentum

  • Iowa roadway named project of the year

    A six-lane roadway has been named the 2005 Outstanding Civil Engineering Project by the Iowa chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers.