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  • Locals spend almost as much on roads as states

    Among other findings, this report states the obvious: "The various levels of government should communicate and operate as partners." In the meantime, cities and counties are increasingly taking matters into their own hands.

  • Thirsty thieves target California fire hydrants

    Local officials have dissolved a Southern California fire agency after it was caught stealing water for a friend of the department head, and as the state continues to face serious drought, fire hydrants are becoming more of a target.

  • Warm-mix asphalt or concrete?

    Warm-mix asphalt may be cheaper initially, but concrete wins on life-cycle costs. According to the Portland Cement Association, that is.

  • The rumble strip ruckus

    DOTs installed thousands of miles of rumble strips to qualify for safety stimulus dollars, and FHWA constantly touts how well this inexpensive surface treatment works in minimizing accidents. Unfortunately, not everyone's a fan.

  • VIDEO: The half-a-million-dollar sink hole

    According to engineers, it was caused by a city-owned storm drain failure.

  • Engineering's where the money's at

    Civil engineers can expect to bring home nearly $2 million in lifetime earnings, says a Washington, D.C., think tank.

  • Where to find current parking, striping, signage regs

    QUESTION: A supervisor recently asked me for information on striping and signage of parking lots for ADA compliance, and I found “ADA Business Brief: Restriping Parking Lots” on the Department of Justice website. However, the document is dated January 2002. Is this information still accurate?

  • 2010 ADA Regulations: Section 502

    You must read the advisories to better understand how to comply with the regulations.

  • NYC maintenance facility gets new life as community building

    The building, in the DUMBO section of Brooklyn, is set to be part of Brooklyn Bridge Park and will include an environmental education classroom.

  • Water utility chooses asset-management program

    Portland Water Bureau serves roughly one-quarter of Oregon’s residents via its own 2,000-mile supply-and-distribution network as well as wholesalers. This software will help managers allocate resources for maximum impact.