Other stories by Stephanie Johnston

  • Why the Highway Trust Fund is doomed to go broke

    A proposal to raise $164 billion over 10 years won’t pass in time to keep the Highway Trust Fund from going broke by the end of August. And the White House doesn’t support it.

  • Adapt your planting plan

    Selecting tree species with internal genetic traits that promote resilience to external threats reduces the vulnerability of the future urban forest.

  • Plant a diverse tree palette

    The goal of every public works program should be to plant as diverse an array of trees as possible.

  • How to keep elected officials happy

    King County (Wash.) has implemented a system designed to keep both staff and elected officials out of the hot seat.

  • City of Ravenna-Ohio DOT joint garage

    A multijurisdictional public works collaboration benefits school districts and other government agencies.

  • Complete 30 hours continuing education at your desk

    The 11,000 drinking water professionals at the American Water Works Association convention in Boston earned 4,500 continuing education units and/or professional development hours. Couldn’t go? No sweat: You can still earn credits.

  • Seven new drinking water products

    American Water Works Association exhibitors showcased easy-to-use items that increase a crew’s productivity without time-consuming training.

  • Pipe-tapping teams beat the clock (video)

    Every year, winning men and women's teams from American Water Works Association state chapters travel to the association's annual conference to see who can tap into a cement-lined ductile iron pipe the fastest. Here are the latest additions to the Pipe Tapping Hall of Fame.

  • U.S. Supreme Court sides with public whistleblower

    Five years ago, Edward R. Lane was fired for firing a state legislator on his payroll who wasn’t doing any work. The U.S. Supreme Court has unanimously vindicated him.

  • White House $302B highway cure is ‘fantasy’

    The Obama administration’s proposed successor to MAP-21, the two-year surface transportation package that expires at the end of September, gives roads and bridges 38% more funding. So why do critics call it a “fantasy package”?