Other stories by Stephanie Johnston

  • WRRDA provides for water, sewer, and waterway projects

    The Water Resources Development Act’s recent reauthorization gives local water and sewer authorities two much-needed things: more influence on federal projects that affect their constituents and a new financing option.

  • An Infrastructure Vacation

    Assuming I can ever afford to retire, I have two travel fantasies. Both rely on sound infrastructure.

  • U.S. Supreme Court sides with public whistleblower

    Edward R. Lane was fired for firing a state legislator on his payroll who wasn’t doing any work. The U.S. Supreme Court has unanimously vindicated him.

  • There’s more to life than a PE license

    Twenty-four professionals were recently certified as infrastructure inspectors or stormwater managers by the American Public Works Association. You don't have to be a member to take advantage of the association's educational offerings.

  • Saved! At least through May 31, 2015

    The Highway Trust Fund’s not going broke after all, thanks to a grudging, 11th-hour save by Congress. But pensions are being raided to make it happen.

  • Public works professionals as innovators

    This year's APWA Top 10 Leaders debunk the notion that government is not innovative.

  • Cycling kills (but you can stop it)

    I saw a billboard the other day that could only have been inspired by Chicago’s bicycling boom: A law firm offers to win damages from errant motorists for pain and suffering, medical expenses, lost income, and disfigurement.

  • 5 projects vie for international engineering award

    Four of the five projects that could be the world's Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement for 2015 are in the U.S.

  • New law provides relief from deadly water scourge

    In 1987, three Canadians died after eating mussels that weren’t very healthy themselves. The tasty bivalves had been feasting on one of many algae species that have turned the Gulf of Mexico and other coastal waters into “dead zones.”

  • Curing pervious concrete: what's your take?

    A contractor and equipment owner argue over how important superabsorbant polymer (SAP) is to the future performance of pervious concrete. Who's right?