Other stories by Stephanie Johnston

  • EVERY Week Should Be Public Works Week

    Happy National Public Works Week! The American Public Works Association launched this annual celebration in 1960. Not to be outdone, a coalition of business, labor, and policy-makers has launched Infrastructure Week. If infrastructure’s so important, why don’t more elected officials commit to...

  • Engineering a Public Works Workforce

    For most public works departments, community service goes beyond maintenance and repair. The City of Mandeville (La.) Public Works Department (MPWD) is no different.

  • Not-so-Happy Drinking Water Week?

    President Reagan signed the first National Drinking Water Week proclamation in 1988. Only one president since then has signed a similar declaration. How should water utilities interpret that?

  • Licensed Engineer Pens Sequel to Award-Winning Novel

    We introduced you to Michael Ganas' extracurricular creative activities in 2008. The engineering firm leader's action-adventure sequel revolves around technology that uses the energy stored in ocean water to generate electricity.

  • This is America’s Oldest Concrete Street

    The public works department in a small Ohio town is having a very busy week. The caretakers of the nation’s first “artificial stone” street are hosting concrete enthusiasts eager to celebrate a public asset installed 17 years after Custer’s last stand.

  • This is America’s Oldest Concrete Street

    The public works department in a small Ohio town is having a very busy week. The caretakers of the nation’s first “artificial stone” street are hosting concrete enthusiasts eager to celebrate a public asset installed 17 years after Custer’s last stand.

  • Tinted road salt could mean happier residents

    From visibility to efficacy, municipalities opt for salt additives to improve winter road treatments.

  • Six excellent snow-and-ice control resources

    Resources ranging from APWA to industry experts and research boards.

  • Tennessee and other southern states attracting retirees

    Nashville is growing so fast, it's in serious danger of a real estate bubble.

  • Thin Is In in More Ways Than One

    As you read this, I'm at World of Asphalt in Nashville. A lot of educational sessions teach contractors how to help public customers (that's you) squeeze as much life as possible out of pavement. But I'm confused, and wonder if you have an answer.