Other stories by PE

  • Unexpected Payoff

  • The Long and Winding Road

    Permitting a water source in an environmentally sensitive area.

  • A Thorough Introduction

    How to ensure new hires are comfortable with the “lay of the land” as quickly as possible.

  • Bacteria in the Bayous

    In urban waterways, bacteria can come from many sources: storm-water runoff, illicit discharges, wildlife, leaking septic systems, sanitary sewer overflows, stream sediments, wastewater effluent, topsoil, and leaking sanitary sewer systems. Some contribute pollutants during dry weather and some...

  • Ready or Not

    Context-sensitive design involves the input of all stakeholders so infrastructure projects can balance economic, social, and environmental objectives while meeting the needs of end users.

  • Two for one

    A dual-purpose gravity sewer can take the pressure in a growing city.

  • Pipe-within-a-pipe

    Avon Lake Municipal Utilities in Ohio found a way to save $1 million on one portion of its $20 million sewer-separation project, which the EPA approved in 2004 and is expected to be fully completed in 2020.

  • No More ‘Paralysis by Analysis’

    A schedule is an essential tool for owners, contractors, their staffs, and third parties (such as regulatory agencies) to communicate on a construction project. But if it's hard to understand, or if it doesn't accurately reflect what steps are ahead, it thwarts teamwork. Before you know it, the...

  • Gaining Control

    In 2001, overflows cost the Pima County Wastewater Management Department in Arizona more than $600,000. That same year, the department launched a multiyear program to install a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) flow-monitoring system powered in part by the sun and linked by remote...

  • Leaving the levees behind