Other stories by PE

  • The Long and Winding Road

    Permitting a water source in an environmentally sensitive area.

  • A Thorough Introduction

    How to ensure new hires are comfortable with the “lay of the land” as quickly as possible.

  • Bacteria in the Bayous

    In urban waterways, bacteria can come from many sources: storm-water runoff, illicit discharges, wildlife, leaking septic systems, sanitary sewer overflows, stream sediments, wastewater effluent, topsoil, and leaking sanitary sewer systems. Some contribute pollutants during dry weather and some...

  • Ready or Not

    Context-sensitive design involves the input of all stakeholders so infrastructure projects can balance economic, social, and environmental objectives while meeting the needs of end users.

  • Two for one

    A dual-purpose gravity sewer can take the pressure in a growing city.

  • Pipe-within-a-pipe

    Avon Lake Municipal Utilities in Ohio found a way to save $1 million on one portion of its $20 million sewer-separation project, which the EPA approved in 2004 and is expected to be fully completed in 2020.

  • No More ‘Paralysis by Analysis’

    A schedule is an essential tool for owners, contractors, their staffs, and third parties (such as regulatory agencies) to communicate on a construction project. But if it's hard to understand, or if it doesn't accurately reflect what steps are ahead, it thwarts teamwork. Before you know it, the...

  • Gaining Control

    In 2001, overflows cost the Pima County Wastewater Management Department in Arizona more than $600,000. That same year, the department launched a multiyear program to install a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) flow-monitoring system powered in part by the sun and linked by remote...

  • Leaving the levees behind

  • Recycle the road

    Now that energy prices are rising, with infrastructure budgets not yet adjusted to keep up with the increases, it is time look for ways to amplify our reuse of asphalt pavements where possible.