Other stories by Jenni Spinner

  • The whys and wherefores of Wi-Fi

    A wireless Internet access deal—whether privately subsidized or provided free of charge by a company like Google or Earthlink—might look like an appealing, potentially profit-making venture for a public works department to take on. However, according to a study by the Reason Foundation, such an...

  • Clang, clang, clang went the trolley

    It might have been the end of the line for a retired trolley car, had a group of dedicated railway enthusiasts not stepped up to revive it. As a result, the car is nearly restored to its former glory, and the people behind its rejuvenation got a valuable lesson in how to use federal transportation...

  • Forecast 2007: wastewater/stormwater

  • Getting to the root of the issue

    A Gardena, Calif., company has come up with a solution that helps sidewalks and trees coexist peacefully.

  • Heaping the benefits

    While farming out services like water treatment has become nearly as common as a new Starbucks, landfills are one area in which public ownership still dominates. According to the National Solid Wastes Management Association, two thirds of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills remain in the hands of...

  • Bye-bye, blue bags

    Windy City denizens were surprised when Mayor Richard Daley announced that, after more than a decade, the city would be abandoning the blue-bag recycling program.

  • News Briefs December 2006

    Brief news from the public works field.

  • PW at the Movies: Flushed Away

    PUBLIC WORKS goes to the movies to review new animated feature FLUSHED AWAY.

  • Crude crud creates a craze

    Kids are fascinated by gross things; they also dig learning how stuff works. Combining the two, San Diego created an ingenious program to teach youngsters all about the gross and groovy world of sewers.

  • The greenhouse effect

    While many greenery-minded municipalities buy their bedding plants, shrubs, and other vegetation from private nurseries, some parks departments have found that maintaining a city greenhouse saves money, provides flexibility, and improves constituent relations.