Other stories by Jenni Spinner

  • Will Bridge Collapse Boost Funding?

  • No big deal

    When an event brings more people into a small town than the normal population, the public works department has to be ready. Water, wastewater, trash, roads, parks—all are impacted far beyond their originally intended capacity. Here's how two towns reacted.

  • PW at the Movies: The Simpsons

    The new Simpsons movie is worth the price of admission, whether you're a die-hard fan or not.

  • Wheel Genius

    In November 2000, the Greater Clark (Clark County, Wash.) Parks District started looking at turning its 56-acre Pacific Community Park into a first-class, multipurpose facility.

  • Background on the Underground

  • Good Neighbors

    Los Angeles chief forester George Gonzalez believes sidewalks and trees are just as much a part of a city's infrastructure as a road, a water main, or a sewage pipe--but most cities don't realize the true worth of either. He thinks it's high time they did.

  • Reservoir Daisies

    Rather than buy land for a new reservoir, the city opted to revamp the existing one. Unfortunately, the public works staff didn't have the time or expertise to perform the work themselves.

  • Infrastructure to the Rescue

    The city of Phoenix has increased in size from its incorporation in 1881 (2500 residents) to today (1.3 million), turning it in a little more than a century and a quarter from a humble desert town to the fifth largest municipality in the country.

  • Low-impact leader

  • The Host

    PUBLIC WORKS reviews the sci-fi thriller The Host