Graffiti Removal

  • Art or graffiti: the stikman phenomenon

    He's turned up in dozens of cities, and no one quite knows why.

     
  • Most cities have a problem with graffiti in at least one location  bridges, underpasses, and electrical boxes are popular targets. After seeing this phenomenon on his industrial buildings, in 2008 Ivy-It founder Sergio Martinez came up with a solution. For more examples of the anti-graffiti ivy in use, go to www.pwmag.com. For more about Ivy-It, visit www.ivy-it.com, email info@ivy-it.com, or call 909-447-0469

    Anti-grafitti ivy

    Having problems keeping public assets free of graffiti? Try covering them with ivy! That’s what the City of Lynwood, Calif., did two years ago.

     
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    Cracking down on crime countywide

    Online service makes it easier to catch vandals as they move from city to city.

     
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    From eyesore to artistry

    Bostonites transform defaced utility and light boxes into works of art.

     
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    The Gallery's Closed

     
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    Common Cause

    For four decades, graffitists (also called taggers, depending on what they're creating and the motive behind it) have used infrastructure as the canvas for showcasing their talents. It's art, they say; but the public calls it vandalism, and charges public works with managing the cycle of removal...

     
  • Graffiti Busters Get Tough on 6-year-old 'Criminal'

    The blight costs Big Apple businesses and government millions of dollars annually, but after a recent collar in Brooklyn, citizens and officials are wondering if the rules are too tough.

     
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    Battling graffiti with paint brushes

    The very thought of tackling a graffiti-ridden city strikes terror in the heart of even the most seasoned public works officials. Even after the graffiti tags are cleaned up, the battle continues. It's usually a matter of only days before it comes back—sometimes on a larger scale.

     
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    Getting tough on graffiti

    More than two years after the completion of an important Los Angeles public works project, the contributions of a chemical manufacturer continue to contribute to the city's landscape. The manufacturer developed a solution that helped save the city $17.2 million and create a graffiti-free zone in...

     
 
 

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