• [Consolidation] is being done without considering organizational ability. Some are well run (leave alone) and some are poorly run (need changes).
  • We share equipment and fuel depot use with surrounding towns.
  • The county water and sewer authority provides reservoirs and treatment plants; municipalities still service their customers. Local politics make this a challenging proposition.
  • NYC Department of Design and Construction has taken over NYC Department of Sanitation construction capital improvement projects.
  • Opportunities for consolidation are being assessed.
  • Local government consideration of fleet services.
  • New York State encourages local collaboration/consolidation, but archaic laws hinder the process.
  • As a county agency, we've assisted cities, villages, and townships for years in hopes of reducing taxpayer cost on various items; and see this expanding as the law allows in the future.
  • Many local governments are consolidating services and sharing the costs without a state mandate. The drop in tax revenues and lack of state assistance is requiring consolidation to balance budgets.
  • Some consolidations, like police dispatch, make sense. A neighboring city sells anti-icing liquids to us, which works well and saves money. We've used other cities' underground pipe video systems.
  • [Consolidating] would be disastrous because each local government would need equipment and personnel when the other city's using it; there would be real issues responding to needs.
  • It's a great idea. We've participated in informal staff-level discussions with other agencies on ways to share resources or consolidate services.
  • Cities within each county could work together to do projects and thus save public funds.
  • Bureaucracies never use a keen sense of the obvious (my term for “common sense”) in restructuring. Instead, they add another committee with attached "fees" to examine the process.
  • Some jurisdictions are in preliminary talks.
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