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PUBLIC WORKS BRIEFS

PUBLIC WORKS BRIEFS

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    Joan Hicken, Philadelphia's new recycling coordinator.

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    EIP Associates

    Water sourcesImported water accounts for 36% of participating agencies' water supplies. Other water supplies mentioned by respondents typically include agricultural surface water.

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    John Moynier

    Even during periods of flooding, local public agencies must maintain stormwater flows in Miners Ravine, a designated salmon habitat, rather than divert it for possible consumptive uses. Though this is not the best-case scenario for communities with a water shortage, California does not have sufficient available storage to capture storm runoff.

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    PGMS

    In 2002, Hollywood, Fla., won in recognition of its well-maintained business district.

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    UDOT

    The Utah DOT used prefabricated concrete panels to replace the deck on its I-80 bridge.

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    Dufresne-Henry

    Boston's redesigned Mission Hill Playground—which won an award from the Boston Society of Landscape Architects—includes handicap-accessible equipment, a basketball court, and a spray pool.

Chicago weighs curbside recycling

Mayor Richard M. Daley said Chicago could pay for initiation of a curbside recycling program by leasing three of its transfer stations to private entities. City officials are considering dropping the current blue-bag recycling program, in which residents place recyclables in plastic bags and put them in with regular garbage, because only approximately 13% of residents currently are participating.

Road management courses available

The National Highway Institute offers a course on Principles and Tools for Road Weather Management. The one-day course is geared toward helping participants address road weather problems and respond properly to weather events. The program is intended for people engaged in various aspects of highway maintenance, including local transportation, and public works agencies. For more information or to complete an onsite course request form, visit www.nhi.fhwa.dot.gov.

Report: $53 billion in water investment

According to the “Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Programs: 2005 Annual Report”—available from the U.S. EPA—state and federal governments have invested nearly $53 billion in the CWSRF program to rebuild wastewater infrastructure over the past 18 years. The report also includes innovative ideas of state CWSRF programs, and updates the program's financial performance. Since its inception in 1988, the program has made nearly 17,000 loans. For more information or to obtain a copy of the report, visit www.epa.gov/owm/cwfinance.

Boston playground wins design award

The rejuvenation of a dilapidated playground in Boston's inner city has received applause from a regional landscape architecture group.

The redesign of Mission Hill Playground received a 2006 Honor Award from the Boston Society of Landscape Architects. North Springfield, Vt.-based architecture firm Dufresne-Henry teamed with the city's Parks and Recreation Department and artist Ross Miller on the project, adding handicap-accessible playground equipment, a basketball court, grassy seating areas, and a spray pool.

For more information about the project, visit www.dufresne-henry.com.

Trenchless trendsetters recognized

The North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT) has recognized a number of municipalities for their contributions to development of the industry.

The group presented a number of winners with its 15th Anniversary Industry Achievement Award. Recipients were chosen for promoting trenchless technology, furthering education, and involvement in noteworthy projects. The winners include the Los Angeles Public Works Bureau of Engineering, in recognition of the staff's investigation into new trenchless technologies, materials, and sewer rehabilitation methods. Other municipal winners include agencies in Boston, Atlanta, Honolulu, and Nashville.

For a complete list of winners or more information about the program, visit www.nastt.org/nodig.html.

EPA, engineers to improve wetlands

The U.S. EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers—looking to protect the nation's wetlands—are proposing a rule that would ensure more effective wetlands restoration and preservation.

“We are focusing on a watershed approach for improving wetlands conservation in this proposed rule,” said John Paul Woodley Jr., assistant secretary of the Army's Civil Works division. Provisions proposed in the rule include increased public participation and encouragement of watershed-based decisions.

The agencies are welcoming public comment on the rule. For more information, visit www.epa.gov/wetlands mitigation or www.usace.army.mil/public.html.