Launch Slideshow

Extreme-duty snowplow

The Truck Stops Here

The Truck Stops Here

  • Extreme-duty snowplow

    Extreme-duty snowplow

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/c90a2191-47f1-484e-81ce-dbde2223f01c_tcm111-474684.jpg?width=553

    true

    Extreme-duty snowplow

    553

    Boss Snowplows

    The BOSS Power-V XT multiposition plow features a 37-in. flared blade wing that clears paths through any type of snow. Available in two models, it removes heavy, wet snow, breaks through massive snowdrifts, and clears snow from doors and buildings. Features include 1/2x6-in. high-performance cutting edges, a chainless hydraulic cylinder lifting system, and a sight system that allows operators to align the truck and plow from the comfort of the cab.

  • Automated transmission

    Automated transmission

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/ce88cd6f-20f9-4b90-acb4-774fcd583250_tcm111-474687.jpg?width=558

    true

    Automated transmission

    558

    Roadranger

    The automated UltraShift HV (Highway Valve) medium-duty transmission features an optional park pawl that, when engaged, simultaneously locks the transmission and the vehicle's drivetrain and driven wheels. The feature ensures that the vehicle remains stationary when parked, which creates a driving environment more like that of an automobile than a commercial truck. The transmission also can engage the hold mode in any gear for continuous operation on a variety of grades.

  • Secure storage

    Secure storage

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/cbcb6325-a524-461b-bdb0-d8ed37f82363_tcm111-474690.jpg?width=385

    true

    Secure storage

    385

    Knaack Manufacturing Co.

    Monster Box jobsite storage solutions feature heavy-duty tubular steel framing and recessed locks that are UL-rated and weather- and drill-resistant. The four-point crane lift system supports 2500 lbs., and the Power Pass grommet allows pass-through of electrical cords with the box closed and locked. The 1010 Chest has 31-cu.ft. storage capacity, the 1000 Piano Box holds 48 cu. ft., and the 1020 Cabinet holds 52 cu. ft.

  • Air filters for engines

    Air filters for engines

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/82504d9d-f9ab-4a2b-9b70-3aeb2dba4cf1_tcm111-474693.jpg

    true

    Air filters for engines

    600

    Baldwin Filters

    Channel Flow air filters need less installation space than most, and offer twice the capacity (1 unit of contaminant per unit volume). The flat and corrugated media, formed by a honeycomb network of channels, eliminates the need for a center tube and wrapper. Air enters open channels, contaminants are trapped inside the filter, and clean air flows out adjacent open channels. This straight-through design increases air flow so high-performance engines can meet tough exhaust emission standards.

  • Fleet management

    Fleet management

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/d8c5db44-6759-4eb1-a80f-4c6a4aad8699_tcm111-474695.jpg

    true

    Fleet management

    600

    Digital Dispatch Systems Inc.

    Available via any Internet browser, efleet is a hosted fleet management service that includes wireless dispatching, GPS tracking, and job updates. It includes the Vector 530 mobile data terminal and the iPilot 8000 mobile data touch-screen computer. Each has an easy-to-read display, intuitive user interface, clear day and nighttime viewing, and audible alerts. The optional SmartPrint mobile printer authorizes credit cards and prints professional receipts.

  • Vehicle lifts

    Vehicle lifts

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/e6e48a72-5008-4a55-8698-920c08ea5a58_tcm111-474698.jpg

    true

    Vehicle lifts

    600

    Girolift USA/Canada Hydraulic Equipment.

    With15,000- to 60,000-lb. lifting capacities, Girolift lifts have few moving parts (no chains, cables, or pulleys) for easy operation and low maintenance. Seven models are available, all featuring trouble-free hydraulic synchronization. Each also has a direct-lift cylinder in each post; mechanical locks in each column with single-point, air-operated release; and a built-in jack rail that doubles as an air supply.

  • Truck bed

    Truck bed

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/fd09bfdc-5bb4-47ff-89a8-25e7b57a715b_tcm111-474702.jpg

    true

    Truck bed

    600

    Blue Ridge Manufacturing

    Designed for ??- and 1-ton trucks, the ProContractor truck bed provides durability and Western style. It has a high-gloss, black powder-coat finish and is shot-blasted and pre-treated with iron phosphate and steam. Other features include an asphalt undercoating, reinforced wheel compartment, and gooseneck hitch compartment with trap door, ball-mounting hitch plate, and D-ring. Custom lay-down sides offer easy-access cargo control.

  • Cargo trailer

    Cargo trailer

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/aed59a4f-1391-4bb3-92c6-8ea0a7015f41_tcm111-474703.jpg

    true

    Cargo trailer

    600

    Adrian Steel Co.

    The company's trailer products include storage modules with cabinets, drawers, and adjustable shelving for all sorts of tools, equipment, and ladders. Choose preconfigured, trade-specific storage modules or mix and match components to create a custom module. Shelving units and preconfigured modules include a Z-rail kit for installing to the trailer.

  • Low-flow valve controls

    Low-flow valve controls

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/25aef713-ef8d-46de-95ab-74b9f7b695a8_tcm111-474707.jpg?width=574

    true

    Low-flow valve controls

    574

    Parker Hannifin Corp.

    The VO40 Open-Center Directional Control Valve for compact equipment is rated at 10.6 gpm and 4350 psi. This low-flow sectional valve can be stacked to 10 sections. It offers a lock-valve option for applications where no leakage or function drift is allowed. Plus, its unique spool design reduces cycle time and its large cross-section seals ensure reliable operation and eliminate the chance of incorrect assembly during service or restacking.

  • Air heaters and coolant heaters

    Air heaters and coolant heaters

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/769a58d5-345e-46cd-965f-8902bb2b962c_tcm111-474710.jpg

    true

    Air heaters and coolant heaters

    600

    Espar Products

    The company's compact air heaters have heat outputs from 6000 to 41,000 BTU and two to four heat levels for cycling between levels to maintain the user-set temperature. Also available, with outputs from 5500 to 120,000 BTU, are compact coolant heaters for applications ranging from engine preheating to supplemental heating. They cycle between two to four heat levels to maintain a constant water temperature called for by the control unit. Safety features including flame sensors, temperature regulating, and overheat sensors.

Public fleet managers oversee diverse fleets, specifying everything from flat-bed trucks and utility vans to garbage trucks and trailers.

While vehicle options are growing in complexity and sophistication, you're under increasing pressure to document taxpayer return on investment.

Given these two factors, you can't just buy what you've always bought.

To keep maintenance and operation costs down, the NTEA recommends a simple four-step design process to ensure you deliver vehicles that meet all your customers' needs.

Step 1: Determine what the truck needs to do.

Don't be satisfied with, “I need a pickup truck.” Thoroughly explore what will make that truck most productive for that department. Perhaps a simple class upgrade will add durability to the vehicle and extend its life.

Ask what the vehicle will be used for. Exactly what will that department be hauling? How far will it be driven, and how often? What special circumstances will drivers and/or operators encounter, and how often?

For example, will the truck haul equipment? Does the driver need to be able to get equipment on and off the truck frequently? Will material be hauled to unpaved jobsites? What kind of material is being hauled, and how much? Will the truck have different uses at different times of the year? How many employees will it carry regularly?

Think about the environment in which the vehicle will be driven. Consider how features can improve or hinder productivity. Look at the performance of that department's current trucks. Ask drivers which truck styles and equipment they prefer, and why.

Step 2: Explore technical details.

Now that you've identified what the vehicle must do, figure out how to make it happen.

How much payload weight and volume will the vehicle have to carry? What are the dimensional requirements, based on the size and shape of materials that are transported? Will the vehicle be used to plow snow?

Then ask about performance requirements.

What's the optimal speed with a full load, braking considerations, and fuel economy? If alternative fuel or hybrid technology is important, determine the availability and costs of alternate fuels so your customer can weigh the cost-effectiveness and performance of traditional versus alternative fuels.

What type of truck body and/or special equipment does the customer need? Account for the size of special equipment to be upfitted to the chassis; the weight of these components; cargo storage needs; component installation requirements and operational requirements, such as power sources for equipment; and equipment access.

You also must account for accessory items like generators, hose reels, and compressors. Your dealer can be a useful resource in this process.

Step 3: Consider operating conditions and environment.

How often will employees drive the truck in the city, on the highway, off-highway, and in combination? Will they use it predominantly in level or hilly terrain? Evaluate its operational cycle, including desired cycle time and daily hours of operation. Also consider loading cycle, climate/weather, and maintenance.

These factors will help you select the correct engine, transmission, and other components.

For example, if the vehicle will be used in temperatures above 90° F for an extended period, you may want to upgrade the engine and transmission cooling systems, select high-temperature-rated tires, and specify deeply tinted glass in the cab. In very humid climates, you may choose to relocate air system tanks or use remote drain systems to facilitate manual draining, install upgraded air dryers, and specify heated mirrors and windows.

Step 4: Review the maintenance histories of existing vehicles.

Look for common failure patterns to see if you need to upgrade vehicle specifications. Typical high-maintenance areas include suspension systems, front-end/ steering, brakes, engines, transmissions, differentials, and vehicle frames.

This can also alert you to other potential issues. If a particular truck has higher maintenance costs than similar vehicles in the fleet, that truck's driver may be responsible. Repeated repairs within a short period may point to poor maintenance and repair procedures.

— Johnson is director of fleet relations for the National Truck Equipment Association.

Related Articles & Web Exclusive Content