NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 24:  Cars travel over a section of highway riddled with potholes on February 24, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. After one of the most severe winters in recent history, New York City's streets have become treacherous in areas, with city workers operating around the clock doing repairs to the roadway. Numerous accidents, auto damage and road closures have resulted from the potholes. While the cracked and rutted roads develop from a variety of causes, salt and plows on winter roads are a major contributing factor to potholes.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 24: Cars travel over a section of highway riddled with potholes on February 24, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. After one of the most severe winters in recent history, New York City's streets have become treacherous in areas, with city workers operating around the clock doing repairs to the roadway. Numerous accidents, auto damage and road closures have resulted from the potholes. While the cracked and rutted roads develop from a variety of causes, salt and plows on winter roads are a major contributing factor to potholes. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Christoph Mertz is a researcher at Carnegie Mellon who created a computer program to try and find ways to combat transportation problems in the city of Pittsburgh. As part of Carnegie Mellon’s Traffic 21 research arm, he has built a computer program that, "uses photos to detect cracks in street pavement. He’s been testing it using photos extracted from the video he shoots in his own car, but he’s also working with the city to test the technology. “ 

As more research and tests are done on the project, it could revolutionize street repairs in the future. The technology could locate road cracks that may go unnoticed with just the naked eye and improve overall road quality in cities nationwide.

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