A worker fixes the siding on an outside wall as construction continues on the Western Hemisphere's largest seawater desalination plant in Carlsbad, California, April 14, 2015. Desalination has emerged as a newly promising technology in California in the face of a record dry spell that has forced tough new conservation measures, depleted reservoirs and raised the costs of importing fresh water from elsewhere. The biggest ocean desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere, a $1 billion project under construction since 2012 on a coastal lagoon in the California city of Carlsbad, is nearly completed and due to open in November, delivering up to 50 million gallons of water a day to San Diego County. To match Feature USA-DESALINATION/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTR4XD3D
A worker fixes the siding on an outside wall as construction continues on the Western Hemisphere's largest seawater desalination plant in Carlsbad, California, April 14, 2015. Desalination has emerged as a newly promising technology in California in the face of a record dry spell that has forced tough new conservation measures, depleted reservoirs and raised the costs of importing fresh water from elsewhere. The biggest ocean desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere, a $1 billion project under construction since 2012 on a coastal lagoon in the California city of Carlsbad, is nearly completed and due to open in November, delivering up to 50 million gallons of water a day to San Diego County. To match Feature USA-DESALINATION/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Mike Blake - RTR4XD3D

A recent report from the Brookings Institution suggests that beginning a workforce development program for infrastructure jobs can both improve America's aging infrastructure and supply jobs. CityLab's Laura Bliss goes on to explain that these new jobs would not just be short-term construction work but includes other fields that fall under infrastructure such as energy, water, and roads.

Brookings estimates that some 14.5 million Americans (11% of the workforce) are involved in supporting the systems of infrastructure. Workforce development programs help to prepare individuals for these jobs:

And though wages for these jobs are often well above national averages, roughly two-thirds of these jobs only require a high school diploma or less for entry. They do, however, require special knowledge and tools. Based on 2014 data from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration, roughly 12 million infrastructure workers need certain skills that can’t necessarily be learned in traditional education settings.

Read More