Launch Slideshow

Error: less than 300px wide output not yet supported

Increasing work-zone safety

Increasing work-zone safety

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp2F7%2Etmp_tcm111-1332223.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Longitudinal channelizing barricades increase pedestrian and vehicle safety around construction zones. Photos: Water Barrier Manufacturers Association

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp2F8%2Etmp_tcm111-1332226.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    In addition to making construction areas safer, water-filled barricades can be more affordable and easier to use than concrete alternatives.

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmp2F9%2Etmp_tcm111-1332230.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    In September, the Federal Highway Administration presented a demonstration of longitudinal channelizing barricades, inviting disabled individuals to test them in simulated work zones.

Demonstration shows off barriers

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) further addressed the need for longitudinal channelizing barricades by partnering with the American Traffic Safety Services Association to sponsor the first-ever Pedestrian Accommodation and Delineation Devices Demonstration. This outdoor event took place at the FHWA Turner-Fairbanks Research Center on Sept. 22, 2004, in Washington, D.C.

Various longitudinal channelizing barricades were displayed in a simulated work zone walkway; visually and physically disabled individuals then walked or used wheelchairs in the simulated work zone area and tested the effectiveness of different devices. Manufacturers demonstrated existing, modified, or prototype devices in an effort to create safer work zones for all pedestrians. They were also encouraged to enhance or modify existing products to adapt to the new FHWA guidelines.