WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 7:
Assistant General Manager Aklile Tesfaye heads across the parking lot of the new $470 million Class A Biosolids and Energy Facilities at DC Water's Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant October 07, 2015 in Washington, DC.  
(Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)
Katherine Frey WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 7: Assistant General Manager Aklile Tesfaye heads across the parking lot of the new $470 million Class A Biosolids and Energy Facilities at DC Water's Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant October 07, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)

In October D.C. Water, treating sewage from the nation’s capital, Maryland, and surrounding Northern Virginia suburbs, became the first utility in North America to turn sewage waste into electricity. In short: D.C. is "turning poop into power."

This unique, Norwegian technology is the first of its kind to use “pressure cooker” technology that can easily fit in tight, urban treatment plant. The technology is not only environmentally friendly, but will also save the city approximately $2 million on treatment chemicals and approximately $11 million on trucking expenses annually. This new technology could be replicated in cities all across the U.S.

To learn more about this unique treatment system, how D.C. has adopted it, and how it all works, click below.

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