Grants, Loans & User Fees

  • Reducing Risk

    Four years ago, King County, Wash., implemented a project-assessment system that's reducing unpleasant cost and timeline surprises on multimillion-dollar public works projects.

     
  • Public Works magazine's 2014 AEC survey

    Does spending more on consulting services indicate public works departments have better budgets or thinner work forces? The answer lies somewhere in the middle.

     
  • Highway Trust Fund woes: the word on the street

    As lawmakers scramble to come up with a solution that will prevent the Highway Trust Fund from going broke next month, officials, experts, and pundits have been weighing in on social media. Here's a look at the latest comments.

     
  • Why the Highway Trust Fund is doomed to go broke

    A proposal to raise $164 billion over 10 years won’t pass in time to keep the Highway Trust Fund from going broke by the end of August. And the White House doesn’t support it.

     
  • Mitigating a high-risk project

    Most people wouldn’t consider building a trail particularly risky. But like any project there are inherent challenges that, if not addressed, will slow construction and increase costs.

     
  • Public Works magazine's 2014 AEC survey: In-house help wanted (finally)

    Does spending more on consulting services indicate public works departments have better budgets or thinner work forces? The answer lies somewhere in the middle.

     
  • A little $ help from your friends

    Crowd-funding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo can help get projects funded.

     
  • Highway Materials Group Lauds Funding Plan

    The Highway Materials Group commends Sens. Chris Murphy (D-CT) and Robert Corker (R-TN) on their proposal to ensure future funding of the surface transportation system by increasing the federal motor fuels tax by 12 cents.

     
  • White House $302B highway cure is ‘fantasy’

    The Obama administration’s proposed successor to MAP-21, the two-year surface transportation package that expires at the end of September, gives roads and bridges 38% more funding. So why do critics call it a “fantasy package”?

     
  • A $17 billion highway spending program

    The House of Representatives’ fiscal year 2015 (FY15) funding bill gives the U.S. DOT $17.1 billion, and community planning and development $6.2 billion.

     
  • At long last: new water funding

    Water and sewer construction and rehabilitation projects expected to cost $20 million are eligible for funding through a new federal program. In communities with less than 25,000 people, $5 million projects are eligible.

     
  • How the Senate would spend $265B on highways

    The Senate Appropriations Committee's plan would fully fund the federal surface transportation funding package that expires on Sept. 30. But it wouldn't solve the looming Highway Trust Fund shortfall.

     
  • Illinois' Municipal Partnering Initiative (MPI)

    A joint buying initiative gaining momentum in suburban Chicago has saved participating communities more than $1.23 million since it was launched three years ago. Thirty communities have joined forces to procure a wide range of public works and construction services.

     
  • 63,000 U.S. bridges need structural repairs

    State-by-state analyses of FHWA’s 2013 National Bridge Inventory data show that state and local agencies don’t have, and never will, the resources to meet repair and replacement needs.

     
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Is MAP-21 helping road agencies move ahead?

    What's working and what's not with the latest federal highway bill.

     
  • Toll road LOWERS rates

    But only because rating agency considers state DOT more reliable funding source than toll revenues.

     
  • Led by maintenance supervisor Greg Abeyta, county road crews make 15-minute patches in preparation for a slurry seal and restripe that will add bike lanes to a recently inherited former state highway.

    2014 Outlook: Albuquerque, N.M.

    Rather than float another add-on to the sales tax, we asked the county commissioners to require that franchises be renewed and commit the revenues to street rehab and preservation.

     
  • Paying for transit-oriented development

    How one agency in Utah is weaving all of the elements together.

     
  • If you've never conducted a rate study, or you want to update one that's several years old, the process can be broken down into eight steps.

    8 steps to an accurate cost-of-service analysis

    Use this methodology to explain your agency’s true costs and revenue needs to elected officials.

     
  • Not-so-complete streets

    In the struggle to accommodate vehicles, pedestrians, bicycles, and public transit, cities end up with too much or too little parking. Here's how to avoid that.

     
 
 
 
 

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