WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 31: A field survey team create a 3D scan of a  late 18th century vessel before dismantling it on Dec. 31, 2015 in Alexandria Virginia.
Construction crews finishing up a hotel site in Alexandria found the remnants of the ship that was used to create new land north of the warehouse and a privy and bulkhead wharf. 
 
(Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post)
Kate Patterson WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 31: A field survey team create a 3D scan of a late 18th century vessel before dismantling it on Dec. 31, 2015 in Alexandria Virginia. Construction crews finishing up a hotel site in Alexandria found the remnants of the ship that was used to create new land north of the warehouse and a privy and bulkhead wharf. (Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post)

At the site for a new hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, a large ship scuttled between 1775 and 1798 was unearthed. Archaeologists discovered this ship on the same one-block site where they discovered what is believed to be a 1755 foundation for the city's first public building.

These findings are a rare occurrence in an urban environment that has experienced disturbance. According to Patricia Sullivan, the discovery have attracted attention from the public and given joy to archeologists:

The find has archaeologists surprised and ecstatic. Unlike the warehouse, which was noted in old city records, there was no known documentation of the buried ship’s existence.

“This is like the jewel in the crown for us right now,” said John Mullen, Thunderbird’s principal archaeologist.

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