Launch Slideshow

Error: less than 300px wide output not yet supported

2006 Trendsetters

2006 Trendsetters

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCB7%2Etmp_tcm111-1347845.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Katie Curry's efforts to encourage others to recycle have made her a local hero. Plus, she gets to sit on her own hard-earned benches when she needs to take a break from bicycling around town with family. Photo: Mary Ann Carter/Black Star

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCC0%2Etmp_tcm111-1347883.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Andres Duany

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCC1%2Etmp_tcm111-1347886.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    John Duncan Jr.

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCC2%2Etmp_tcm111-1347890.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Al Gore

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCC3%2Etmp_tcm111-1347894.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Interstate Highway System

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCC4%2Etmp_tcm111-1347898.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Tim Pawlenty

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCB8%2Etmp_tcm111-1347851.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Rich Giani (seated, second from left), water-quality manager at Washington, D.C.'s Water and Sewer Authority, headed a research team that revealed how chloramines affect the leaching of lead into drinking water. Photo: DC WASA

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCB9%2Etmp_tcm111-1347855.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Illinois Road and Transportation Builders Association president Kathleen Holst is more concerned about road-related issues than she is about her status as the association's first female leader. Photo: IRTBA

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBA%2Etmp_tcm111-1347858.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Bruce Logan is using bacteria in wastewater to create electricity. Photo: Shaoan Cheng

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBB%2Etmp_tcm111-1347864.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Raymond Seed worked without pay to discover why New Orleans's flood control system failed during Hurricane Katrina. Photo: Jenni Spinner

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBC%2Etmp_tcm111-1347868.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    At 35, Kris Riemann is the youngest public works director Gulfport, Miss., has had. Thanks to careful planning, the city was the first to restore services after Hurricane Katrina. Photo: Pat Sullivan

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBD%2Etmp_tcm111-1347872.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Diane Linderman asked Congress to allocate homeland security funds directly to public works as well as police and fire agencies. Photo: APWA

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBE%2Etmp_tcm111-1347875.jpg?width=250

    true

    Image

    250

    Joe Haworth (middle) urges public agencies to partner with each other to educate their customers about what they do. “Much of the public wants to help; they just need to be told what to do.” Photo: LACSD

  • Image

    http://www.pwmag.com/Images/tmpCBF%2Etmp_tcm111-1347878.jpg?width=150

    true

    Image

    150

    Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter

For the complete list, click here.

----------------------------------

Getting the public into publicity

Joe Haworth, information officer and division engineer, Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Calif.

Haworth has spent a career making customers care about public infrastructure.

In 1971, as project engineer for the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Haworth felt the agency's work was too valuable to go unnoticed simply because his colleagues had neither the time nor the inclination to explain their contribution to public health. So he asked his boss if he could formalize the agency's public-outreach efforts into an information office.

He started by getting speaking invitations at schools and chambers of commerce, where he passed out brochures on how waste-water is treated and where solid waste goes. He invited residents to join advisory committees. He wrote articles, books, and brochures for local and national associations. He volunteered his materials and services to other agencies. He taught public speaking to masters candidates at Loyola Marymount University's environmental-engineering program.

In the 1980s, he got a coalition of public agencies and private corporations to cast aside their ownership issues and form a foundation (www.thinkearth.org) that targets students. He partnered with local agencies on another program in which high school students run a “baby sewage plant” for a week. “Kids love the ‘yuck factor' of sanitary sewer systems,” says Haworth. “By the end of these courses, half want to work for you, and some even say they want to be sanitation engineers.”

In 1997, he joined a group of local newspapers in developing an educational supplement that reaches 4 million customers every other month, including a large Spanish-speaking population.

By the time Haworth retired in July, his eight-member office was spending $1 million a year on communicating with the agency's 5 million customers.

“If you're enthusiastic and persistent, you'll convince people that infrastructure is a worthy community activity,” says Haworth.

— Stephanie Johnston